Spin® Life Blog

The Cyclists’ Glossary Part Two

The Cyclists’ Glossary Part Two

Posted by Spinning® on Apr 18th 2018

By Kate Amos After posting the Cyclists’ Glossary last June, we here at Spinning® wanted to share a few more terms for you to recognize on the road or in your Spinning classes.Burn a Match (verb): To put in a hard effort. Every rider has a limited amount of all-out efforts they can complete, and choosing to spend that precious energy is called burning a match. When a rider finally cracks and is out of energy, they are all out of matches.Casquette (noun): A funny little hat worn by hard-core cyclists. The bill of a cycling cap is much shorter than that of a baseball hat, and it fits easily under a helmet. It’s a great choice for covering up bad hair days and bald spots in Spinning class, where a helmet might garner some sideways glances.Cleat (noun): Not just for field sports, cleats are also an integral (literally) part of cycling footwear. Made of metal or plastic, the cleat is fastened to the bottom of the cycling shoe and clips into specially-designed pedals, allowing the rider to affix their shoe directly to the pedal. This gives the rider the most efficient and powerful pedal stroke possible.Glass Crank (noun): It’s not the latest in weight-weenie technology; the glass crank is what riders use when pedaling gently. Often a derogatory term for riders shirking their fair share of work in a breakaway, it’s also a good metaphor for thinking about pedaling style during recovery between intervals.Off the Front/Back (noun): The former is a great place to be, but the latter is not. When riding in a group, the rider who attacks to get ahead of the rest of the pack is said to be off the front, whereas those who lose contact with the peloton from behind are off the back. Speaking of which…Peloton (noun): The main group of riders in a race, otherwise known as the pack, field or bunch in English. Riding in a large group like this can greatly reduce the wind resistance each rider faces, so it’s a key element in outdoor team rides.Take a Pull (noun): To ride in the front position of a group of cyclists for a limited amount of time. The leading rider is exposed to 30-50% more air resistance than the riders following. While a valid tactic for beating your buddies in a sprint to the finish line or the town line, skipping a pull will quickly make you the least popular rider in the bunch.Ready to hit the road for an outdoor ride? Find all the gear you need and subscribe to our newsletter for more outdoor riding tips!